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Sunday, December 10, 2017





first snow stick drawing...
snow and Earth cosmologies
Paint Rock NC


Love, Peace and CoCreativity
Water is Life
~~~~~~~~




Saturday, December 9, 2017





Paint Rock stones tribute
circle Fire charcoal with stone with stones, vegetation, Water & Earth cosmologies
Shelton Laurel Creek/tributary with Big Laurel Creek with French Broad River...
Laurel NC


Love, Peace & CoCreativity

Water is Life
~~~~~~~~



Friday, December 8, 2017





Paint Rock stones tribute
circle Fire charcoal with stones, vegetation, Water & Earth cosmologies
Shelton Laurel Creek/tributary with Big Laurel Creek with French Broad River...
Flag Pond TN


it is presumed that Flag Pond is named for the abundance of Blue Flag that grows in the area...
healing prevails...

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Dlanglois

“Blue flag was one of the most popular medicinal plants amongst various native North American Indian tribes. In modern herbalism it is mainly employed to detoxify the body - it increases urination and bile production and has a mild laxative effect. Some caution should be exercised in its use, however, since there are reports that it is poisonous. The fresh root is quite acrid and when taken internally causes nausea, vomiting, colic and purging. The dried root is much less acrid. This remedy should not be prescribed for pregnant women. The root is alterative, anti-inflammatory, cathartic, cholagogue, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic and sialagogue. Taken internally as a tea, the root has been used as a strong laxative or emetic that also acts strongly on the liver and promotes the excretion of excess body fluids. It is also stimulant for the circulatory and lymphatic system. Its detoxifying effect make it useful in the treatment of psoriasis, acne, herpes, arthritis, swollen glands, pelvic inflammatory disease etc. Externally, it is applied to skin diseases, wounds and rheumatic joints. The roots are harvested in late summer and early autumn and are usually dried for later use. The roots were boiled in water and then mashed to make a poultice which was used to relieve the pain and swelling associated with sores and bruises.”

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

http://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Iris+versicolor


Love, Peace & CoCreativity

Water is Life
~~~~~~~~


Thursday, December 7, 2017





Paint Rock stones tribute
local circle fire charcoal with stones, vegetation, Water & Earth cosmologies
Nolichucky River
Limestone TN , birthplace of Davy Crockett 

the bondage many of us feel today may be more entwined, larger and a more condenseed version of what Crockett wrote about...  he was killed with his weapons and violence at hand at the Alamo fighting Mexican forces that were trying to capture back their lands... this is the self perpetuating nature of warring and fear based moralities... there is resolution beyond fate when we choose to embrace each other and our selves with a mythology of cooperating toward accepting peaceful functioning among all selves, tribes and cosmologies...

In this letter, written in December 1834, Davy Crockett complains about President Andrew Jackson’s forced removal of the Cherokees from their homes to Oklahoma. Crockett opposed that policy and feared Vice President Martin Van Buren would continue it, if elected president. He even goes so far as to say that if Van Buren is elected, Crockett would leave the United States for the “wildes of Texas.” Crockett writes, “I will consider that government a Paridice to what this will be. In fact at this time our Republican Government has dwindled almost into insignificancy our [boasted] land of liberty have almost Bowed to the yoke of [sic] Bondage.” Crockett actually went to Texas before Martin Van Buren was elected president, and he died in the Battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836, months before the election. 

Excerpt from the letter; 
"I have almost given up the Ship as lost. I have gone So far as to declare that if he Martin vanBuren is elected that I will leave the united States for I never will live under his kingdom. before I will Submit to his Government I will go to the wildes of Texas. I will consider that government a Paridice to what this will be. In fact at this time our Republican Government has dwindled almost into insignificancy our [boasted] land of liberty have almost Bowed to the yoke of Bondage. Our happy days of Republican principles are near at an end when a few is to transfer the many."...
https://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/age-jackson/resources/davy-crockett-removal-cherokees-1834
Love, Peace and CoCreativity
Water is Life
~~~~~~~~



Wednesday, December 6, 2017





Paint Rock stones tribute
local circle fire charcoal with stones (stone on the right is a solid Yellow Ochre composite 2' x 2' x 3'), vegetation, 
Water & Earth cosmologies
Nolichucky River
Erwin TN

Nolichucky River
While the origins of the name-place have long been debated and remain unclear, it is believed to be derived from the name of the Cherokee village Na’na-tlu gun’yi, or "Spruce-Tree Place," that once stood near modern Jonesborough, Tennessee. Others argue that, according to local lore, it actually means "Rushing Water(s)", "Dangerous Water(s)", or "Black Swirling Water". …
During the 1770s, European frontiersmen established the "Nolichucky settlements" along the river in modern Greene County, Tennessee, in what was then part of Cherokee territory. These settlements were aligned with the Watauga settlements in what is now Elizabethton, Tennessee. As hostilities intensified in the mid-1770s between the settlers and a faction of the Cherokee, known as the "Chickamaugas," who were opposed to the settlements, John Sevier, at the time a young militia officer, began overseeing the construction of Fort Lee. After an invasion was launched by Chickamauga leader Dragging Canoe in July 1776, Sevier abandoned the unfinished fort and fled to the Watauga settlements. Sevier would later acquire the nickname "Nolichucky Jack," or "Chucky Jack," for his exploits along the river and in its vicinity.
Famed frontiersman Davy Crockett was born along the river near Limestone, Tennessee, in 1786. The site is now the focus of Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park.
The turn of the century brought trains hauling passengers (until 1955) and mostly coal on the Clinchfield Railroad (now operated by CSX), which still runs alongside the river through the gorge with bridged crossings at Unaka Springs (Erwin, Tennessee) and Poplar, North Carolina. At least one sunken railcar sits at the bottom of the river near the entrance to the Lost Cove Settlement, a civil-war era ghost town just upriver (and uphill) from the once-disputed Tennessee-North Carolina border.
Between Poplar, North Carolina, and Unaka Springs, Tennessee, the Nolichucky River Gorge provides one of the more scenic and technical whitewater trips in the Southern United States, due in large part to its constant (and often rapid) fluctuations… wikipedia.org/wiki/Nolichucky_River


Love, Peace and CoCreativity
Water is Life
~~~~~~~~



Tuesday, December 5, 2017





stump ends
a body, mind & soul treelogy
local circle Fire charcoal, stump ends, vegetation & Earth cosmology
Paint Rock NC

Love, Peace & CoCreativity
Water is Life
~~~~~~~~




Monday, December 4, 2017




stump ends
a body, mind & soul treelogy...
local circle Fire charcoal, log ends, vegetation & Earth cosmos
Paint Rock NC

Love, Peace and CoCreativity
Water is Life
~~~~~~~~